WINDOWS 7 - Numerous BSODs

Friday, August 30, 2019

TSF - https://www.techsupportforum.com/forums/f299/win7-crashing-before-i-can-use-sysnativefilecollectionapp-1235666-2.html#post7749486



Code:

BugCheck A, {fffff80002ba68a0, 2, 0, fffff80002881142}
Probably caused by : amdxhc31.sys ( amdxhc31+25cd0 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff98019702f10, fffff980197020e8, 4740f8, 32}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+141e2 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff98013da6e80, fffff98013da6268, f94188, 32}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+141d7 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff9801bc66f50, fffff9801bc66428, b140b8, 32}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+42ad )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff9803b936e80, fffff9803b936228, 734188, 32}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+141d7 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff9801bb74fc0, fffff9801bb74268, 134040, 23}
Probably caused by : FLxHCIc.sys ( FLxHCIc+18cd5 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff980185daf10, fffff980185da168, 3b40f8, 23}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+141e2 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff98017e2af30, fffff98017e2a028, 6940d8, 23}
Probably caused by : amdxhc31.sys ( amdxhc31+25cde )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff980180b2f10, fffff980180b2368, b740f8, 23}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+141e2 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff9801c490fc0, fffff9801c4903e8, 6b4040, 32}
Probably caused by : amdxhc31.sys ( amdxhc31+25025 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff9801c90cf50, fffff9801c90c268, 1d40b8, 23}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+42ad )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff98054592f50, fffff98054592128, 940b8, 23}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+42ad )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff98025ac8e80, fffff98025ac8268, cf4188, 23}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+141d7 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff98026026fc0, fffff98026026ea8, a14040, 32}
Probably caused by : amdxhc31.sys ( amdxhc31+25025 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck A, {fffff80002b998a0, 2, 0, fffff80002874142}
Probably caused by : amdxhc31.sys ( amdxhc31+25cd0 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff98063700f50, fffff98063700128, 3140b8, 23}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+416d )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff98040fecf10, fffff98040fec268, 3740f8, 23}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+1366a )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff980461eafc0, fffff980461ea168, e14040, 23}
Probably caused by : amdxhc31.sys ( amdxhc31+23c39 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck 1A, {5100, fffff6fc5006f030, 3a, 20}
Probably caused by : memory_corruption ( nt!MiFlushTbAsNeeded+309 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff98046082e80, fffff98046082af0, e14188, 23}
Probably caused by : amdhub31.sys ( amdhub31+1365f )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C4, {e3, fffff88003630501, 7fefd7905f0, 0}
Probably caused by : cmdguard.sys ( cmdguard+8501 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C4, {e3, fffff88003662501, 7fefcf505f0, 0}
Probably caused by : cmdguard.sys ( cmdguard+8501 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C4, {e3, fffff88001808501, 7fefd9d05f0, 0}
Probably caused by : cmdguard.sys ( cmdguard+8501 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C4, {e3, fffff880046f5501, 7fefdcc05f0, 0}
Probably caused by : cmdguard.sys ( cmdguard+8501 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck C1, {fffff9805f41efc0, fffff9805f41e228, 694040, 23}
Probably caused by : amdxhc31.sys ( amdxhc31+23c39 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck 1000007E, {ffffffffc0000005, fffff88007017e26, fffff88002571808, fffff88002571070}
Probably caused by : athurx.sys ( athurx+8e26 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck 1000007E, {ffffffffc0000005, fffff88004a16e26, fffff8800bac6808, fffff8800bac6070}
Probably caused by : athurx.sys ( athurx+8e26 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck 50, {fffff8000000fb0f, 8, fffff8000000fb0f, 0}
Probably caused by : athurx.sys ( athurx+9f3bb )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``
BugCheck 1000007E, {ffffffffc0000005, fffff88007016e26, fffff88002586808, fffff88002586070}
Probably caused by : athurx.sys ( athurx+8e26 )
¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨``


CONCLUSION: 29 dumps; 6 different bugchecks; 5 different 3rd party drivers named as "probable cause" - 3 possible hardware related bugchecks (0xa, 0x50, 0x1a) - suggest we would wait until the other drivers are updated first; then check system stability as the 3 potential hardware bugchecks may be flukes.



John

BSOD: Geek Squad did not fix. Now no more League of Legends

Monday, August 19, 2019

 
jcgriff2
  • BSOD Kernel Dump Expert
  • 1,238 posts
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Posted Today, 12:47 PM
Hi. . .
 
I hope that you did not pay Geek Squad because they missed a most obvious clue.
 
The problem appears to be an outdated Broadcom wifi driver, which unfortunately can only be obtained from the system msnufacturer and they rarely ever update wifi drivers. This is why I tell people to only buy systems with Intel wifi as Intel always keeps their drivers updated.
 

bcmwl63a.sys Thu Feb  6 01:57:28 2014 (52F35C88)
Your driver is from February 2014 - an eternity in the life of a wifi driver. Intel updates their drivers every 4-6 months.
 
Be sure to check the system manufacturer's site for a driver update - miracles do happen.
 
If this is a laptop, probably the only way to stop the blue screens is to purchase a USB wifi adapter; something like one of these -  
 
 
Good luck to you.
 
Regards. . .
 
jcgriff2

244x90_BC_04-04-2019.png

Computer crashes after few minutes when putting to sleep - BSOD

BC - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/702602/computer-crashes-after-few-minutes-when-putting-to-sleep/?p=4852247



jcgriff2


  • BSOD Kernel Dump Expert

  • 1,237 posts

  • ONLINE

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    • Local time:12:33 PM
    Posted Today, 12:33 PM
    Hi. . .
     
    You are getting closer - but no cigar yet!
     
    With 0x9f (0x3,,,) bugcheck dumps, you need to run the !irp command on P4 (Paremeter 4 - the 4th number inside the parenthesis after the 0x9f bugcheck).
     
    So... after you run !analyze-v and perhaps one of the list [loaded] modules commands (like lmnt or lmntsm to view the loaded [into RAM] drivers, you then want to run a  .bugcheck command to obtain P4, then run the   !irp command. It should then tell you the 3rd party driver that is hiding under pci.sys. pci.sys is a Microsoft Windows driver and therefore cannot be the actual cause of your BSODs as Windows drivers are sacrosanct.
     
    Anyway, in one of your dumps (all 3 dumps, by the way, had 0x9f (0x3,,,) bugchecks). So I just selected one of them - filename = 081419-18203-01.dmp
     
    As I mentioned, I first executed a Windbg kd> command - .bugcheck (note the period before "bugcheck"); the result -
    Bugcheck code 0000009F
    Arguments 00000000`00000003 ffff970c`7019f060 fffff807`6058e8b0 ffff970c`7e96f620
    The number we are after here is P4 - the 4th number (the memory address of the blocked IRP), which is ffff970c`7e96f620
     
    Then you issue the !irp command followed by P4, like this -
    !irp ffff970c`7e96f620 
    -
     
     
    . . .the output will be this -
    0: kd> !irp ffff970c`7e96f620
    Irp is active with 5 stacks 4 is current (= 0xffff970c7e96f7c8)
     No Mdl: No System Buffer: Thread 00000000:  Irp stack trace. 
         cmd  flg cl Device   File     Completion-Context
     [N/A(0), N/A(0)]
                0  0 00000000 00000000 00000000-00000000      Args: 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
     [N/A(0), N/A(0)]
                0  0 00000000 00000000 00000000-00000000      Args: 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
     [N/A(0), N/A(0)]
                0  0 00000000 00000000 00000000-00000000      Args: 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
    >[IRP_MJ_POWER(16), IRP_MN_SET_POWER(2)]
                0 e1 ffff970c7f0c7050 00000000 fffff8076399b3d0-ffff970c84fcdc00 Success Error Cancel pending
           *** WARNING: Unable to verify timestamp for L1C63x64.sys
    *** ERROR: Module load completed but symbols could not be loaded for L1C63x64.sys
     \Driver\L1C nt!PopSystemIrpCompletion
       Args: 00014400 00000000 00000004 00000002
     [N/A(0), N/A(0)]
                0  0 00000000 00000000 00000000-ffff970c84fcdc00      Args: 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000
    ... but you are only after the portion of non-zero numbers in the center -
    >[IRP_MJ_POWER(16), IRP_MN_SET_POWER(2)]
                0 e1 ffff970c7f0c7050 00000000 fffff8076399b3d0-ffff970c84fcdc00 Success Error Cancel pending
           *** WARNING: Unable to verify timestamp for L1C63x64.sys
    *** ERROR: Module load completed but symbols could not be loaded for L1C63x64.sys
     \Driver\L1C nt!PopSystemIrpCompletion
       Args: 00014400 00000000 00000004 00000002
    If you look through that jumbled mess of data, you will see    L1C63x64.sys  
     
    That is your  Qualcomm Atheros AR8171/8175 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet Controller (NDIS 6.30) driver (this info came from a file in your zip attachment - systeminfo - at the very bottom of the report).
     
    Next, we look up the driver in the Sysnative Driver Reference Table (DRT) as we need a driver update site. The DRT contains over 4,500 drivers in it that we've been working on for over 9 years now. Drivers are manually added 1-by-1 to the SQL DRT table.
     
    DRT - https://www.sysnative.com/drivers/ -- enter the driver name in the search box
     
    It returns - https://www.sysnative.com/drivers/driver.php?id=L1C63x64.sys - and lists 2 possible driver update sites.
     
    Please note that Atheros in general does not keep their drivers updated, so you may not be able to find an update. If so and your system is a desktop PC, you'll need to purchase a new(er) PCIe Ethernet card to continue using Ethernet or live with the blue screens as they will likely increase in number and frequency as time goes on. Basically, you have another app or it could be a Windows networking related driver that is not playing nice with your current Atheros Ethernet driver. Some other driver has a conflict with it. 
     
    The likely problem with your Atheros driver is its age -
    L1C63x64.sys Mon Sep 18 13:32:11 2017 (59C02D4B)
    Two years old for a networking driver in today's world is very old. Most driver developers (like Intel, Netgear, etc...) update every 4-6 months - both Ethernet and wifi.
     
    So, you need to locate an Atheros driver update with a timestamp greater than September 2017.
     
    Please let me know how you make out.
     
    Also, try the !irp command on the dumps. I think that you did very well with Windbg, especially setting up the symbol path, which is where most people trying Windbg fail.
     
    Regards. . .
     
    jcgriff2
     
     
     
     



     
     
     
     
     

    244x90_BC_04-04-2019.png

    "Failed to Repair," restarts, and other woes

    Enable Hidden Administrator
     
     
     
     
     
    jcgriff2

    • BSOD Kernel Dump Expert
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    • Local time:11:16 AM
    Posted Today, 10:56 AM
    Hi. . .

    On the current system first, activate the Hidden Admin user account and see if you can see and access the files you are after -

    https://www.sysnative.com/forums/threads/enable-disable-the-hidden-administrator-user-account-windows-10-8-1-8-7-vista.25824/

    If no-go, place the HDD back into the system as primary, boot-up and activate the Hidden Admin user account.

    There is only 1 Hidden Administrator user account and since you will be using it
    only temporarily, I would advise NOT password protecting it right now. If you were to lose control/access of the Hidden Admin account (it is the account that comes up when the UAC screen appears), you will more than likely have to reinstall Windows.

    What you describe to me sounds like permission setting issues. As far as the no-boot situation, I don't know what to tell you right now. It may have something to do with the upgraded RAM.

    When you increased the RAM to 32 GB, did you install ALL new RAM sticks or did you just add 2 or so RAM sticks to the existing RAM that was already installed?

    If you added to the existing, does all of the RAM match?

    Regards. . .

    jcgriff2


    Edited by jcgriff2, Today, 10:57 AM.


    244x90_BC_04-04-2019.png

    Windows 10 "Failed to Repair," restarts, and other woes - WMIC Memorychip HTML Report

    WMIC Memorychip HTML Report



    BC thread - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/702707/failed-to-repair-restarts-and-other-woes/#entry4852195





  • BSOD Kernel Dump Expert

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    Posted Today, 11:16 AM
    Also, I'd like to see your RAM configuration and info.

    Run #24 from this WMI tutorial - https://www.sysnative.com/forums/threads/windows-management-instrumentation-wmi-windows-10-8-1-8-7-vista.12294/

    Start with the WMI RAM memorychip HTML batch script - http://www.sysnative.com/SysnativeTutorials/wmi/batch/memorychip_h.bat

    The output should look like this - http://www.sysnative.com/SysnativeTutorials/wmi/html/memorychip.html

    If not, run the TEXT output batch file - http://www.sysnative.com/SysnativeTutorials/wmi/batch/memorychip_t.bat

    The output should look like this - http://www.sysnative.com/SysnativeTutorials/wmi/txt/memorychip.txt

    I'd prefer the HTML output. You can run it on the current system as the RAM hardware is the same as the previous non-boot RAM.

    Regardless of which you run, please zip up the file and attach it to your next post.

    Also, please run systeminfo from a CMD Prompt/Screen.

    Then paste it into your post using a BB code CODE BOX.

    To copy the CMD screen, RIGHT-click anywhere on the CMD screen, select "select all"; then hit ENTER. This will select and copy the entire contents of your CMD screen. The CODE BB brackets are necessary to keep the spacing from the systeminfo report aligned.
     
    You can also click on 08-19-2019a.PNG in the menu and then paste the CMD screen contents between the CODE brackets.
     
    If you find an email address in the systeminfo output after pasting into your post, simply remove it. If it is in systeminfo, it will be ~ 5-10 lines down from the top of the report.
     
    Good luck to you!
     
    Regards. . .
     
    jcgriff2

    244x90_BC_04-04-2019.png

    BSOD: Driver Power State Failure

    Friday, August 16, 2019

    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/702378/bsod-driver-power-state-failure/?p=4849725



    NVIDIA Roll back.

    BSOD - DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE - 0x0000009f

    Monday, August 12, 2019

    Posted Today, 02:50 PM
    Hi. . .

    2 of the 5 dumps you submitted were zero (-0-) bytes in size. This means that Windows came down so fast that it did not have time to write a dump or an "unknown" hardware problem exists and the computer literally shut off/lost power before it could write the dump (akin to someone pulling out the electrical plug on a desktop PC.

    BSOD Kernel memory dumps are created to help software developers debug their code, not really to help us with hardware issues. In fact, dump files are incapable of telling us which piece of hardware is/has failed. At best, dumps can point us in a general direction, for example, telling us that an I/O error occurred, which to me means that the system encountered trouble with a hard drive. Again, that was just an example and I was NOT referring to your system.

    Of the 3 remaining dumps, 2 of them had bugchecks = 0xc4 which means that Driver Verifier flagged a driver. The driver named was the Microsoft Windows Network I/O Subsystem driver netio.sys

    This presents at least 2 problems. The Driver Verifier instructions state to only select 3rd party drivers (non-Microsoft drivers). Did you do this step correctly?

    If so, having Driver Verifier list a Microsoft driver leas us to the direction of unknown hardware failure as the probable cause. netio.sys being a Microsoft driver means that it is sacrosanct and could not possibly be the actual cause of the BSOD. If it were, many millions of other people would also be experiencing BSODs because they have the exact same version of that driver that you do.

    The 3rd dump had a bugcheck = [0x9f (0x3,,,)[/b] = DRIVER_POWER_STATE_FAILURE; A device has been blocking an IRP for too long a time. (IRP = Input/Output request packets)

    Digging deeper into the 0x9f dump reveals the blocked IRP -
    >[IRP_MJ_POWER(16), IRP_MN_SET_POWER(2)]
                0 e1 ffff8f8a2f2aa030 00000000 fffff8002ab6f520-ffff8f8a329a9ee8 Success Error Cancel pending
            \Driver\nvlddmkm nt!PopRequestCompletion
       Args: 00000000 00000001 00000001 00000000
    If you look carefully through that seemingly jumbled mess, you'll see nvlddmkm after the word \driver

    nvlddmkm.sys is your NVIDIA video card driver. Your driver is relatively new - just about 1 month old. From your dump file -
    nvlddmkm.sys Wed Jul 17 14:04:33 2019 (5D2F8D61)
    https://www.sysnative.com/drivers/driver.php?id=nvlddmkm.sys

    I would suggest rolling the driver back, but we also need to test your video card.

    Run FurMark - https://www.sysnative.com/forums/threads/furmark-display-card-stress-test.3907/

    Please post the results.

    If Furmark passes, then run Driver Verifier - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/576333/driver-verifier-bsod-related-windows-10-81-8-7-vista/

    Driver Verifier must run for at least 24 hours and it's job is to stress-test your 3rd party drivers and force a BSOD if it detects a violation.

    Please use these settings - https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/576333/driver-verifier-bsod-related-windows-10-81-8-7-vista/

    I must admit that after seeing netio.sys, finding NVIDIA in the 0x9f dump threw me for a loop as I was expecting to see either your wifi or Ethernet driver (a networking driver), not your video driver.

    And of course, the 2 dumps showing zero bytes in size is bothersome. Also, every file in the Sysnative zip file shows as 1/1/1980 12:00 AM, which I have no idea why the files would display like that (but I have seen this phenomenon before) as I wrote the Sysnative app.

    Screenshot of the 5 dump files showing the date and time (timestamp) as well as the two dumps that are -0- bytes in size -

    08-12-2019e.PNG 

    post-208009-0-61397600-1565635656.png

    Regards. . .

    jcgriff2

    p.s. ntoskrnl.exe (that you mentioned WhoCrashed said was the cause of the 0x9f dump) is the Windows kernel and could not possibly be the cause of your BSODs. ntoskrnl.exe is often named as a default of sorts when the real cause cannot be determined. 
    Edited by jcgriff2, Today, 02:51 PM.

    244x90_BC_04-04-2019.png

    BSOD 0x000007e - Atheros wifi

    Sysnative Forums - https://www.sysnative.com/forums/threads/bsod-stop-0x0000007e-error-on-startup.29010/#post-266648



    Atheros USB wifi driver is the cause - athurx.sys



    If the BSODs do get to a point where you can no longer tolerate them, you can replace the USB wifi adapter.

    I would recommend Netgear brand or perhaps TP-Link brand USB wifi adapters as they do generally keep their drivers updated.

    Netgear USB wifi adapters at Amazon - Amazon.com: usb wifi adapter - NETGEAR

    Netgear drivers - download | Support | NETGEAR

    Also, TP-Link seems to have drivers available too -

    TP-Link USB devices - Amazon.com: tp-link usb wifi adapter

    TP-Link driver downloads - TP-Link Product Support - Download Center

    Good luck to you! :-)

    Regards. . .

    jcgriff2



    0x116 BSOD VIDEO_TDR_ ERROR - Video TDR Timeout

    Saturday, August 10, 2019

    Hi. . .

    There were in fact 3 BSOD dumps.

    The bugcheck on all 3 dumps was 0x116 = Video TDR Timeout - the video driver attempted to reset itself but could not do so within the time allotted (30 seconds).

    The probable cause on all 3 dumps listed as your ATI video driver -



    atikmpag.sys Mon Apr 15 20:17:47 2019 (5CB5495B)
    Check ATI for a driver update - https://www.sysnative.com/drivers/driver.php?id=atikmpag.sys

    You're looking for a driver newer than 15 April 2019.

    If after the driver update you are still having issues, swap out the video card for another, even if just temporarily to see if the system stabilizes.

    0x116 bugcheck BSODs generally have two causes - (1) video driver or (2) video card

    Regards. . .

    jcgriff2
     
    Edited by jcgriff2, Today, 01:59 PM.

    244x90_BC_04-04-2019.png

    WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR

    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/702241/whea-uncorrectable-error/?p=4846443



    So a generic BUS error has occurred 
    BUSLG_SRC_ERR_I_NOTIMEOUT_ERR (Proc 0 Bank 22) 
    Thus, the BUS logic has detected an error in the source on processor 0 and MCA bank 22. 
    BUS errors are usually due to two causes 
    -> overclocking including mismatch CPU -> Memory 
    -> overheating of the CPU 



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